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Chapter 1 Review Exercises

Chapter 1 Review Exercises
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  • 21. Speeds of Ironclad Civil War Ships

    During the U.S. Civil War, the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia clashed with the Union ironclad USS Monitor in the Battle of Hampton Roads. The speed of the Monitor was about 9 miles per hour and the speed of the Virginia was about 6 knots. Which ship was faster?

    Monitor vs. Virginia

    • Worked-Out Solution

      To determine which ironclad was faster, convert the speeds to the same units.

      The speed of the Virginia was 6 knots. So, the Monitor was faster.

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      _____     ______    _____      ___      _____   
     / ____||  /_   _//  / ____||   / _ \\   |__  //  
    / //---`'   -| ||-  / //---`'  / //\ \\    / //   
    \ \\___     _| ||_  \ \\___   |  ___  ||  / //__  
     \_____||  /_____//  \_____|| |_||  |_|| /_____|| 
      `----`   `-----`    `----`  `-`   `-`  `-----`  
                                                      
    
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  • 22. Converting Fathoms to Feet

    The phrase "deep six" means to throw something away. It was originally used by boaters to mean 6 fathoms. Convert this depth to feet.

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      ______    ______    _  _    _    _     ______  
     /_____//  /_   _//  | \| || | || | ||  /_   _// 
     `____ `    -| ||-   |  ' || | || | ||  `-| |,-  
     /___//     _| ||_   | .  || | \\_/ ||    | ||   
     `__ `     /_____//  |_|\_||  \____//     |_||   
     /_//      `-----`   `-` -`    `---`      `-`'   
     `-`                                             
    
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  • 23. Left of Territorial Waters

    Territorial waters around the United States used to be defined by the reach of a cannon ball fired from shore, or a "cannon shot." One cannon shot was defined as 3 nautical miles.

    1. Convert 1 cannon shot to miles.
    2. Compare this definition of territorial waters to the modern definition.

       

    • Worked-Out Solution
      1. You can use unit analysis to convert 1 cannon shot to miles.

      2. According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (1982), territorial waters are a strip of coastal waters no more than 12 nautical miles from a determined baseline. This baseline is defined as the mean low-water mark. Territorial waters include the airspace above as well as the seabed below.
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     _    _      ___      ____      ______   ______   
    | |  | ||   / _ \\   |  _ \\   /_   _// |      \\ 
    | |/\| ||  | / \ ||  | |_| ||   -| ||-  |  --  // 
    |  /\  ||  | \_/ ||  | .  //    _| ||_  |  --  \\ 
    |_// \_||   \___//   |_|\_\\   /_____// |______// 
    `-`   `-`   `---`    `-` --`   `-----`  `------`  
                                                      
    
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  • 24. Converting Leagues to Miles

    Jules Verne wrote a famous novel called 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

    1. Convert 20,000 leagues to miles.
    2. At its deepest point, the ocean is about 7 miles deep. What do you think the title of Verne's novel means? Explain your reasoning.

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      _____      ___     __   _     ______  __    __  
     |__  //    / _ \\  | || | ||  /_   _// \ \\ / // 
       / //    / //\ \\ | '--' ||   -| ||-   \ \/ //  
      / //__  |  ___  ||| .--. ||   _| ||_    \  //   
     /_____|| |_||  |_|||_|| |_||  /_____//    \//    
     `-----`  `-`   `-` `-`  `-`   `-----`      `     
                                                      
    
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  • 25. Converting Fathoms to Feet

    Below is an excerpt from William Shakespeare's The Tempest.

    Full fathom five thy father lies;
    Of his bones are coral made;
    Those are pearls that were his eyes:
    Nothing of him that doth fade
    But doth suffer a sea-change
    Into something rich and strange.

    Shakespeare writes that the man lies 5 fathoms deep. Convert this depth to feet.

    • Worked-Out Solution

      Use unit analysis to convert 5 fathoms to feet.

      So, the man's body lies 30 feet deep.

      www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2006677488/

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      _____      ___                 ___              
     /  ___||   / _ \\      ___     / _ \\    ____    
    | // __    / //\ \\    /   ||  | / \ ||  |    \\  
    | \\_\ || |  ___  ||  | [] ||  | \_/ ||  | [] ||  
     \____//  |_||  |_||   \__ ||   \___//   |  __//  
      `---`   `-`   `-`     -|_||   `---`    |_|`-`   
                             `-`             `-`      
    
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  • 26. Converting Feet to Fathoms

    Mark Twain was the pen name of Samuel Clemens, who spent several years as a steamboat pilot. He chose the name because the leadsman on a steamboat would call out "mark twain" to indicate that the water depth was 12 feet and safe for the boat to pass. Convert this depth to fathoms.

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     _    _     _____     _____     ______   _    _   
    | |  | ||  |  ___||  /  ___||  /_   _// | \  / || 
    | |/\| ||  | ||__   | // __     -| ||-  |  \/  || 
    |  /\  ||  | ||__   | \\_\ ||   _| ||_  | .  . || 
    |_// \_||  |_____||  \____//   /_____// |_|\/|_|| 
    `-`   `-`  `-----`    `---`    `-----`  `-`  `-`  
                                                      
    
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